Homemade Yoghurt (Dairy free and dairy options!)

When it comes to finding a dairy free yoghurt that’s tasty, has a good nutrition profile, reasonable price AND contains calcium, it’s near impossible in Australia. This was my main driver in deciding to make my own yoghurt a few years ago. My partner on the other hand, just really likes yoghurt, so making our own is more cost-effective and means less trips to the shops! I’ve added in my comparison images to see what I mean (bottom of page, after recipes).

We typically make our yoghurts overnight, and then they’re ready for the next day and really, don’t take up much of your time. You can modify these recipes quite simply to fit your dietary needs/preferences too. Let me know if you give it a try!



Dairy Free, Vegan Yoghurt

Ingredients

Equipment

  • EasiYo yoghurt maker (can get from supermarket ~$20, often on sale too)

Method

1. Sterilise the EasiYo container by rinsing with boiling hot water (be careful. Not to be condescending, I just burn myself ALL the time at step 1)

2. Boil your kettle.

3. Pour the milk into the container and add in the culture- mix it in a little do it isn’t sitting on top or clumped at the bottom. Put the lid on the container.

4. As per EasiYo instructions, fill yoghurt maker with boiling water up to the filling line. Then, place your container with the milk and cultures in the yoghurt maker and place the lid on the yoghurt maker.

5. That’s it! Leave it to set for at least 8 hours (I find 9-10 works best for me. If you like a more sour yoghurt, leave for up to 12 hours).

6. After this time has passed the yoghurt is done- keep in the fridge and consume within a week. If you’re unsure how long you’ve had it, a simple smell and taste test will work- if it’s a bit sour smelling or fizzy to taste, the bacteria have beaten you to the chase and it’s gone off.

Notes:

  • Milk choice: I’m sure you could use some other variations by this brand or similar, though I haven’t tried. You generally want minimal ingredients so less interferes, though sugar is ok. See Green Living’s advice re: coconut and almond milk recipes. Always check to ensure your milk of choice is fortified (Look for at least 100mg calcium per 100mL)

  • Using a store-bought yoghurt: Make sure the yoghurt says it contains live cultures, not just lists probiotics/strains in the ingredient list. It doesn’t matter if it’s a soy, almond, cashew etc yoghurt, but choose unflavoured with little ingredients. Sugar is fine- it provides food for the bacteria.

  • You can make this yoghurt without the yoghurt maker- some use a thermos, their oven, anything that can maintain the temperature for 8+ hours. I haven’t tried myself.

  • If wanting to flavour the yoghurt, do so after unless you're using another starter kit/mix that has ensured this won't interfere with the process.

  • Be sure to follow all sterilisation instructions from manufacturers!

Dairy Yoghurt

Ingredients

  • 1L Complete Dairy full fat, high-protein yoghurt OR yoghurt of choice (can do low fat, lower protein etc)

  • 1/3C Woolworths brand full cream milk powder (again, can use any brand, or skim variety, only including brand as I’ve mentioned cost per 100g)

  • 1/8 tsp Green Living tangy or mild yoghurt starter culture

Equipment

  • EasiYo yoghurt maker (can get from supermarket ~$20, often on sale too)

Method

1. Sterilise the EasiYo container by rinsing with boiling hot water (be careful. Not trying to be condescending, I just burn myself ALL the time at step 1)

2. Boil your kettle.

3. Fill container ½ way with milk container, add in milk powder and mix well. Fill rest of container with milk and add in the culture- mix it in a little do it isn’t sitting on top or clumped at the bottom. Put the lid on the container.

4. As per EasiYo instructions, fill yoghurt maker with boiling water up to the filling line. Then, place your container with the milk and cultures in the yoghurt maker and place the lid on the yoghurt maker.

5. That’s it! Leave it to set for 9 hours.

6. After this time has passed the yoghurt is done- keep in the fridge and consume within a week. If you’re unsure how long you’ve had it, a simple smell and taste test will work- if it’s a bit sour smelling or fizzy to taste, the bacteria have beaten you to the chase and it’s gone off.




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